Carrying 3 catchers on the roster could spell doom for this Reds utility player

Cincinnati Reds catcher Curt Casali (12).
Cincinnati Reds catcher Curt Casali (12). / Charles LeClaire-USA TODAY Sports
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The Cincinnati Reds certainly upgraded their backup catcher position this offseason. After watching Tyler Stephenson go down with injury on multiple occasions and finish his sophomore campaign on the IL, it became apparent that Cincinnati needed more depth behind the dish.

The Reds added University of Kentucky product Luke Maile several weeks ago. Then, just yesterday, Cincinnati decided to reunite with former backstop Curt Casali on a one-year deal.

With Stephenson, Casali, and Maile on the roster, the Reds now appear as though they'll be carrying three catchers into the 2023 season. That could be bad news for Matt Reynolds.

Reds infielder Matt Reynolds could be the odd man out.

Injuries happen, and they happened early and often for the Cincinnati Reds in 2022. So it's always good to have as much depth as possible. But the latest addition of Curt Casali is not good news for Matt Reynolds.

Reynolds made his way to Cincinnati last season after stops in Queens, Kansas City and Washington D.C. Prior to last season, Reynolds had played in just 130 games with an OPS of just .605 and spent all of the 2021 season in Triple-A.

But the veteran was quite useful for the Cincinnati Reds in 2022. Reynolds appeared in 92 games, slashed .246/.320/.332, and saw time at seven different positions. The 32-year-old was the very definition of a plug-n-play utility player.

Roster spots are going to be at a premium next spring. Cincinnati has so many young players coming up through the farm system that it'll be difficult to justify holding on to a veteran like Reynolds.

There's a chance that Matt Reynolds makes the cut and is part of the Cincinnati Reds Opening Day roster in 2023, but his chances certainly took a hit after the addition of Curt Casali to the roster on Thursday.

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